Venezuela is Hungry

Venezuela is Hungry

The people are standing in line for hours just to buy whatever happens to be available that day. Inflation is so high, and wages so low, that it barely pays to go to work. All of their efforts must focus on finding food to feed their hungry children. It sounds just like the stories we heard out of communist Russia and Zimbabwe. There seem to be possible multiple causes of the current disaster, but the bottom line is that you can’t trust the government. Especially a socialist government.

Socialism at Work

It appears that the current trouble in Venezuela began at least a decade ago. It was decided that the environment needed protecting, and in 2007, Former President of Venezuela, Hugo Chavez, announced that Venezuela was going to save the environment and stop global warming by investing in energy conservation efforts.

Hydroelectric power produces 74% of their power. By 2009, the country was experiencing electrical power cuts lasting up to six hours at a time. Drought and under-investment of infrastructure was blamed for the energy shortages.

In 2011, the Venezuelan government announced that the country was experiencing growing pains. They reported that poverty had been reduced and the economy was booming. The government was having trouble keeping up with electrical power demands because the rapid growth was causing increased demands for electricity. The problem grew, and in 2013 the new president, Nicolas Maduro, blamed blackouts on sabotage by his political opposition. The attorney general of Venezuela called on hungry people to “remain calm, not to believe rumors of an alleged food shortage. He announced that “hoarders” were to be arrested and imprisoned.

As events unfolded, there was no “alleged” food shortage but rather an actual food shortage.

In March 2015, President Obama “declared Venezuela a national security threat and ordered sanctions against seven officials from the oil-rich country in the worst bilateral diplomatic dispute since socialist President Nicolas Maduro took office in 2013.”

“Venezuelan officials past and present who violate the human rights of Venezuelan citizens and engage in acts of public corruption will not be welcome here, and we now have the tools to block their assets and their use of U.S. financial systems,” White House spokesman Josh Earnest said in a statement. The United States is Venezuela’s top trading partner, and the OPEC member in 2014 remained the fourth-largest supplier of crude to the United States at an average of 733,000 barrels per day – despite a decade-long effort by Caracas to diversify its oil shipments to China and India.

Venezuela is Hungry

Recent headlines tell the worsening story

Venezuelans Hunt Dogs, Cats, Pigeons as Food Runs Out

Venezuela army deployed to control food production and distribution

Venezuelans cross into Colombia to buy food

“During Carnival, we used to throw eggs at each other just to have some fun. Now an egg is like gold.” – Hot Air

A Socialist Les Miserables in Venezuela

“We want food!” Looting and riots rock Venezuela daily

Raw Venezuela: Looter Burned Alive, While “Streets Filled With People Killing Animals For Food”

Maduro Puts Military In Charge Of Venezuela’s Food, Calls It “Great Sovereign Supply Mission”

“Venezuela, once a wealthy oil state, where the doctors offering “universal health care” have no medicine and starving people loot government stores looking for food…” Sultan Knish

Venezuela food shortages: “No one can explain why a rich country has no food” – Toilet paper, rice and coffee have long been missing from stores, as Venezuelan president blames CIA plot for chronic shortages

YouTube Video:

The End Game For Socialist Venezuela Is A Failed State Heading Toward A Military Dictatorship

Where is the major media? I don’t see many of them covering this story because it speaks ill of socialist governments. The starvation in Venezuela contradicts the narrative that the United States should elect Hillary Clinton as our socialist president.

 

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